1967 Chevelle

Instrument Panel - Group 10.xxx

  • The instrument panel was revised for the 1967 Chevelle to incorporate a collapsible steering column and hazard warning flashers. This change also necessitated moving the windshield wiper switch 1/2" to the right resulting in a different dash strip than the 1966 model.

  • All models featured oil pressure, temperature, generator, parking brake, and brake system warning lights. Also standard were color-keyed turn signal and shift lever knobs, bright control knobs for headlamp and wiper switches, color-keyed instrument pad, glove compartment lock, and cigarette lighter. The high beam indicator lamp was moved to the speedometer cluster.

  • On the Malibu, Concours, and SS 396 the heater control panel was illuminated, an electric clock and glove compartment light was standard. Both the electric clock and glove compartment lamp were optional on the 300 and 300 Deluxe.

  • The upper dash panel on the Chevelle 300 Deluxe is silver-accented, the Malibu and Concours received a walnut finished panel, and the SS396 panel was black-accented. The base Chevelle 300 had no additional panel. A note of controversy. I've personally seen a few SS396 Chevelles (with verified 138xx VIN) from both Baltimore and Atlanta that have the Malibu/Concours style wood grain panel. My last SS396 Chevelle from Atlanta is one of those and I purchased it in 1986.  Numerous owners I've talked to say they did not change this panel. Whether someone, sometime changed the black-accented SS panel to the wood grain cannot be determined due to some having multiple owners. I know when I was rebuilding my SS396 from 1986-1988, I searched high and low for a wood grain dash strip but there were none in reproduction and no used ones that were acceptable.


  • File Photo - 07/16/2011

Below are three examples of SS396 Chevelles with wood-grained dash panels. Factory substitutes/errors or simply numerous owners replacing the black-accented strip with a Malibu piece? It's highly unlikely a substitution was made as several of the bezels are different between the two dash strips; however, the debate continues...

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May ~ Baltimore

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December ~ Atlanta

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June ~ Atlanta
This is my SS396 when I purchased it in September of 1986 with the wood-grained dash strip.

Dash Pad

66 dash pad

The 1966 dash pad extended past the radio speaker grille and almost to the base of the windshield stopping just short of the defroster vents while the 1967 dash pad stopped short of beginning of the speaker grille. Compare this to a 1967 Chevelle dash pad below.

Courtesy Dale McIntosh

Also note the total width of the dash pad between the two years on the side of the dash pad.

66 dash pad
1966

1967 dash pad
1967

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04/27/2010

Also note on these steering columns the upper photos have the correct cover for the column while the car in the photo below does not have this cover. Strangely, most 1967 Chevelles I've personally seen do not have this cover although it's clearly called for in the 1967 Chevelle & El Camino Factory Assembly Instruction Manual. It is possible that these were dropped from production in November of 1966 as these have been noted only on Chevelles through early November from Atlanta, Baltimore, Fremont, and Kansas City so far. Other plants and dates may exist, they just haven't surfaced yet.

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Dash Cover

The dash color depended on the interior color. Both Chevelles below have identical #731 Bright Blue Imitation Leather interior; first Chevelle is painted Deepwater Blue (E) while the second Chevelle is painted Marina Blue (F).

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Likewise a red dash was used when interior was red and a black dash was used when interior color was black.

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Gear Selector Indicator

The transmission type, and whether it was column shifted or floor shifted, dictated what instrument cluster face was installed and which gear selector indicator, if any, was included.

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Column shifted Powerglide gear indicator - Park, Reverse, Neutral, Drive, Low

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Column shifted Turbo Hydramatic 400 gear indicator - Park, Reverse, Neutral, Drive, Low2, Low1

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All manual transmissions and floor shifted automatic transmissions received this cluster face that was devoid of any shift pattern.  The dash above is the standard SS396 dash without the optional gauge package (note the high beam indicator lamp just to the left of the speedometer needle.

Courtesy Jeff Helms
Courtesy Jeff Helms

Another cluster devoid of any shift pattern.  This example is from a U14 Special Instrumentation gauge-equipped Chevelle.  Note there is no high beam indicator lamp on the speedometer face indicating the U14 option.

02/08/2010
Not often seen is the standard 3-speed manual transmission as many buyers chose the 2-speed Powerglide as a minimum transmission upgrade.

Column Gear Shift Lever and/or Turn Signal Lever Knobs

An anomaly in column shift gear selection levers and turn signal levers is the appearance of a chrome knob with black plastic ends as opposed to color-coordinated or black knobs. So far (as of December 2008), only February-built Baltimore Chevelles have been found. These same chrome knobs are common to 1967 Buick Skylarks from Baltimore as well. Whether there is a connection due to the plant or the time frame is uncertain. If you look at other column gear shift and turn signal lever knobs on this page (and I suspect the majority of 1967 Chevelles), you'll see the knobs are color-coordinated with the interior. shown in this section are some examples of a portion of these knobs with a chrome plastic base and color-coordinated or black tip. Even the physical shape of the gear selector knob matches the Buick unit.

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Typical lever knobs on a 1967 Buick GS400. Note the chrome plastic base and black tips.

B152318
B152318
B152318
It's unclear if the turn indicator lever on this car is chrome/black or not but the gear selection lever certainly is. It's known from the trim tag and sequence number of this car that it is a February-built Baltimore SS396.

B102904
B102904
Both lever knobs are clearly visible on this 09C Baltimore Chevelle.

B134459 
Another Baltimore example with a 12B December build date.

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Same uncertainty of the turn indicator lever on this red interior car and the knob color of the gear selection lever is obscured but the chrome plastic base is clearly visible. Date and plant are not known.

Wiper Knob and Ignition Bezel

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Note differences in windshield wiper knobs between 1966 (top) and 1967 (bottom). The 1966 has a protruding button for the washer while the 1967 is flatter.

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The wiper knob on the 1967 dash is moved approximately 5/8-inch to the right from the 1966 location to facilitate collapsible steering column and hazard warning flashers that became standard on the 1967 model year. The 1966 switches measure approximately 2 3/4-inches from headlamp-to-wiper while the 1967 switches measure approximately 3 3/8-inches.

A little difficult to discern here but the ignition bezel on the 1966 has 4 grooves where the 1967 has three. Note the spacing between the grooves.

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1966 Chevelle ignition bezel.

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1967 Chevelle ignition bezel.

Indicator Lamps

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The various indicator lamps on the Chevelle (when Special Instrumentation was not ordered) included an oil pressure indicator light and engine water temperature light in the left lamp pod and a generator indicator light and brake system warning light in the right lamp pod. The headlight beam indicator light is located in the cluster. This dash happens to be a Malibu but all series used the same basic warning lamp arrangement.

Courtesy Elree Colby
When the Special Instrumentation was ordered (RPO U14), the high beam BRIGHT indicator reverted back to the left lamp pod in place of the OIL || TEMP lamps and the BRAKE lamp took over the entire right lamp pod since the GEN lamp was no longer needed.

See Interior > Gauges & Instruments page for more information on RPO U14 and RPO U16 special instruments.

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These are examples of the aftermarket gauges installation. The high beam indicator lamp IS still present showing this is not an original gauge-optioned dash assembly. These aftermarket gauges are a great way to add factory-styled units to your dash but be wary if someone tells you they are original when you see the high beam indicator lamp present. Note the example above the right warning lamps pod is still a dual lamp unit (GEN||BRAKE) but only the BRAKE half is used where a factory installed gauge option changed this particular lamp pod to a BRAKE only lamp and would cover the entire area.

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What's this? A 200-mph dash in a Chevelle? Not quite, this dash is calibrated in kilometers per hour (KPH) for export use.

Tire Pressure Chart and Glove Box Liner

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Although the AIM shows the placement of the tire pressure chart in the center depression, many found their way to one of the other two areas. Note the letter "A" in the bowtie, the 1966 tire pressure sticker did not have this letter "A" in the bowtie. The part number for the tire pressure charts varied early in the model year.

3888745 ~ all except wagon, pickup delivery & SS396 - replaced by #3901998* on 3-3-66
3888746 ~ station wagon - replaced by #3901998* on 3-3-66
3888747 ~ pickup delivery - replaced by #3903401 on 3-3-66
3888749 ~ SS396 - replaced by #3901998* on 3-3-66
3901998* ~ replaced by #3909991 on 9-22-66
3903401 ~ replaced by #3909991 on 9-22-66
3901999* ~ replaced by #3909991 on 9-22-66

According to the AIM, part number 3909991 was the revised number as of 9-22-66 when it replaced #3901998, #3901999, and #3903401 although the stickers to be replaced were used until supplies were gone.  Part numbers 3901998 and 3901999 appear to be mislabeled in the AIM as all examples found to date have been 3910998 and 3910999.

This tire pressure chart was found in an early October Malibu from Atlanta. Note the part number printed on the chart is 3910998 as opposed to the 3901998 listed in the AIM.

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The same 3910998 tire pressure chart sticker has also been seen on a very late June (06E) SS396 Chevelle above and an El Camino shown below.

File Photo - 03/28/2009

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This tire pressure chart sticker, part #3910999, is found on a Baltimore station wagon built in March of 1967, well after the supposed change of all tire pressure stickers to the single part #3909991. Like the tire pressure chart above, the part number printed on this chart is 3910999 as opposed to 3901999. Additionally, this tire pressure chart has the letter "B" in the bowtie in lieu of the normally found letter "A".

Differences in glove box liners between non-air conditioned above and air conditioned are apparent in the (air conditioning-equipped) Chevelle glove box liner below.

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Ignition Strip

Courtesy Pete Small
Chevelle 300
The base Chevelle 300 is devoid of any add-on dash strip and the area is simply painted the same color as the dash itself. Steering wheel is 3-spoke model but lacks any chrome trim.

Courtesy Tim Knierim
Chevelle 300 Deluxe
Note silver-accented dash strip w/centered AC outlet, no radio, no clock, and no bright plate above glove compartment. This 300 Deluxe is also equipped with the optional steering wheel that is standard equipment on the Malibu, Concours, and SS396.

The base El Camino (13380-480) dash is the same style and material as the Chevelle 300 Deluxe.
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red dash

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Malibu
The Malibu and Custom El Camino series substituted a wood-grain dash strip. The silver knob/button on the right side of the steering column is for the, now standard equipment, hazard warning lamp switch. Note this is the 'long' version of the hazard warning flasher knob and is found on a September-built Malibu. This long knob was used through the third week of December of 1966, then randomly with the shorter version through May of 1967 as supplies were being exhausted. After May all should have been equipped with the short version. Also note the column cover present on this car.

Early hazard warning switch - January, 1st week 1967
Another early style hazard warning flasher knob on a Baltimore-built Chevelle in early January, 1967.

09/29/2009
Short hazard warning knob. This example is from a May, 1967 Fremont El Camino.

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SS396
The SS396 series received a black, crinkle finish dash strip. The standard steering wheel on the Malibu and SS396 series were the same except for the horn button. The Special Instrumentation option shown was just that, an option, and NOT standard equipment on the SS396.

To my knowledge the only dash strip currently being reproduced is the black, crinkle finish SS unit. Swapping to the SS-type dash strip into a non-SS car can be done if you have the correct switches and bezels for the SS-type strip. Bezels from the Malibu/Concours wood-grain dash will not work.

Malibu glove box bezel vs. Concours and Super Sport glove box bezel

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Malibu
Note bright radio bezel trim and above the glove compartment with Malibu script. The Custom El Camino shown below received the same Malibu script and dash treatment.

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Malibu script nameplate on Custom El Camino
Since the Custom El Camino was based off the Malibu model, the Malibu script above the glove box was retained.

 Courtesy Chuck Nixon
SS396

Note the Super Sport plate compared to the Malibu script plate in the above photo. The tissue dispenser was a dealer installed accessory.

Courtesy Jeff Helms
Courtesy Jeff Helms
Concours Station Wagon ~ Courtesy Jeff Helms
The Concours station wagon was a 137/13835 series of its own. Since it was not a Malibu (135/136xx) nor was it an SS396 (13817/67), neither of those bezels could be used. So, Chevrolet gave the Concours its own bezel.

1966 Malibu Glove Box Bezel
For comparison, note the 1966 Malibu (and SS396) glove box bezel is 'blacked-out' except for one horizontal line.

Courtesy Dale McIntosh
Some go to extremes to customize their dash. This one loaded with Dakota Digital speedometer, tachometer, and fuel, amp, water temp, and oil pressure gauges. Note the 'V' shape in the dash has been removed, aftermarket A/C vents added and billet headlamp and wiper switches. The factory dash pad has been removed and the entire top and sides of the dash have been covered in a tweed material like the rest of the interior. Since the normal vents in the kick panels were no longer needed, the vent cutouts are now mid-range speakers and even the vent pull knobs have been replaced by tweeters.

Instrument Cluster

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The Chevelle instrument panel cluster. 

  • The 300, 300 Deluxe, as well as Malibu and SS396 instrument cluster when ordered with the center console only contained the fuel gauge and speedometer/odometer.

  • The Malibu, SS396, and Concours series received a clock as standard equipment that would be located in the right pod. 

  • The clock (RPO U35 - $15.80) was an extra cost option on the Chevelle 300 and 300 Deluxe.

  • When the Special Instrumentation (RPO U14) option was ordered (only available on V8 Sport Coupes and Convertibles) the clock was moved to the floor if a console was not ordered.

  • If bucket seats and console were ordered, the clock was installed in the console and the right instrument pod was blank unless the special instrumentation package was ordered. Bucket seats and console were only available on Sport Coupes and Convertibles.

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The standard left-to-right swing fuel gauge pod was replaced with a vertical swing fuel gauge and ammeter. The clock in the right gauge pod was replaced with a mechanical oil pressure gauge and electric water temperature gauge. To accommodate the tachometer, the left blinker lamp was placed inside the tachometer itself since it blocked the standard lamp location. This tachometer has come to be affectionately called the 'blinker tach.'  The oil temperature and generator-brake tell-tale lamps are replaced with "BRIGHT" and "BRAKE" lamps respectively.

Cigarette lighter and headlamp switch placements on the 1967 Chevelle instrument panel

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Assembly of dash trim and w/s wiper knob

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